My quick Google find for "I cannot say thanks to you enough.

You are watching: I can t thank you enough

" changed a lot an ext results than for "I can not give thanks to you enough."

I cannot thank you enough. (6,030,000 results) I might not give thanks to you enough. (448,000 results)

My inquiries are:

Is "I could not give thanks to you enough." just the previous tense the "I cannot give thanks to you enough."?If the answer for the over is No, then once do you use "I might not say thanks to you enough." fairly than "I cannot thank you enough."?
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Could (like would) has actually two different uses.

It functions as the past of can.

He claimed "I can"t say thanks to you enough" -> He claimed he couldn"t thank me enough.

It is a modal in its own right, through the sense of opportunity (not ability, favor can). In this sense, the is regularly in conditionals, and also counterfactuals.

So

I couldn"t give thanks to you sufficient (when you said that).

with past meaning, is a straightforward past tense the I can"t thank you enough.

With existing meaning, the would most likely be taken as something like

(Even if i thanked you all day) i couldn"t say thanks to you enough.

In that feeling it sounds very effusive and also over the top, and is lot less usual than "I can"t give thanks to you enough".


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answered Aug 19 "20 in ~ 15:19
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Colin FineColin wjamesmerse.com
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"Could not" is imperfect tense. It have the right to mean the past, or some continuous condition:

I tried, yet I couldn"t lift the (past tense)I couldn"t background that, the looks too hefty for me (ongoing)

As your search has actually proved, "I cannot thank you enough" is the many idiomatic use of this phrase. It is hyperbole, however literally way that you are so grateful, no amount of thanks you might offer would express completely your appreciation. Saying "I could not thank you enough" would mean virtually the same, except you are saying that you can never give thanks to the person enough.

You might use the phrase referring to a previous act, because that example:

My friend gave me this gift last week. I couldn"t thank him enough.

The usage of "couldn"t" here is correct because the act remained in the past. You may have actually said to your friend at the moment "I can"t thank you enough".


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answered Aug 19 "20 in ~ 14:35
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